Cameron is clamping down on tax fraud. But by the working poor not the idle rich.

Unbelievable, like the plot of a bad science fiction movie.

Pride's Purge

(not satire – it’s the UK today!)

It’s not true at all that the Cameron government isn’t tackling tax fraud.

In fact, it has even brought in a US company – called Concentrix – to help HM Revenue and Customs and is paying the firm millions in taxpayers’ money to tackle tax fraud.

But Concentrix has been ordered to tackle possible tax fraud committed by working people so poor they need tax credits to survive – not rich corporations or individuals who are evading or avoiding tax.

In the meantime, George Osborne claims it’s not his or the government’s job to tackle tax fraud by the wealthy.

One rule for us ………

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Evict The Bailiffs!

nice one jono!

the void

evict-the-bailiffsvia Focus E15

#EvictTheBailiffs at the British Credit Awards! Weds. Feb. 11, 18:00 SHARP!

Focus E15 invite you to the Brewery (52 Chiswell Street, EC1Y 4SD) for 6pm sharp on Weds. Feb. 11, to welcome those arriving at the 2015 British Credit Awards’ £4,000-per-table black-tie affair, in which bailiffs and debt collectors will be receiving awards for making families homeless.

Since companies like ‘The Sherriff’s Office’ receive nominations by throwing people and their belongings out onto the cold streets of London, we intend to turn the front entrance of the Brewery into a mock eviction site for attendees to experience before an evening of champagne, three-course dinners, and the kudos of their peers.

We encourage anyone concerned with social cleansing and the criminalisation of poverty to bring rubbish bags, boxes, and broken pieces of furniture to scatter across the front entrance of the Brewery as guests arrive to receive…

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Redacted: some critical notes on the ideas of Red Action

Nothing is ever lost…..

Cautiously pessimistic

Last year, Manchester University Press published a book called “Against the Grain: The British Far Left from 1956”, which looks as though it might be of interest for anyone who wants to learn from the successes and failures of previous attempts at revolutionary organisation in this country. Sadly, the price tag is £75, which puts it well out of the price range of most casual readers. However, the chapter on Red Action, which looked to be one of the more interesting sections anyway, has now been made available for free on the Red Action archive website, so I was keen to read it, and having read it I thought it was worth typing up a few notes on the subject.

What follows are is not a full review of Red Action as an organisation, based on either personal experience or an in-depth reading of their publications: I wasn’t…

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MMTers: Does Adair Turner have a point?

Nice One!

alittleecon

There’s quite an interesting interview with Lord Adair Turner published here. This bit in particular caught my eye:

“I think the crucial thing, the crucial question you need to answer when you accept that we can do fiat money creation is how to discipline and I’m going to address this subject in a lecture in Germany in February, because some of my very senior German friends have said to me, “Adair, you’re absolutely technically right that this is possible”, but, without quite putting it this way, they say, “we mustn’t tell the people!” Because if the people know, and if the backbenches of Parliament as well as the small elite technocrats know that this is possible, people want to do it – not to the extent of 2% of GDP or not just when we’re in a crisis – they’ll want to do it to the extent of 10%…

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Attlee, labour colonies and the welfare state

Attlee: last men out of Gallipoli.

thelearningprofessor

Clement Attlee Clement Attlee

In 1920, a thirty-seven year old university lecturer published a book on social work. Clement Attlee, later to become famous as Prime Minister of the 1945 Labour Government, had spent several years after graduating at Oxford serving charities in London’s East End, most notably as secretary of Toynbee Hall. Like most men of his background and generation, he was commissioned in the Great War, and was one of the last to be evacuated from Gallipoli.

I was reminded of Attlee’s book when reading Georgina Brewis’ terrific study of student volunteering in Britain. Brewis shows that the university settlement movement of the late nineteenth century was part of an emerging student associational culture in which voluntary social service started to develop some of the forms of professional social work. She also, incidentally, demonstrates the disproportionate significance of women in the movement.social worker

Attlee’s book can be understood as part of the transition from…

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